Queer Eye: Don’t insult women by telling us what to be

There’s no hiding the fact that reality TV is mostly trash. And so are Queer Eye, The Real Housewives, Vanderpump Rules and RuPaul’s Drag Race . These shows are not ethical depictions of LGBTQ…

Queer Eye: Don’t insult women by telling us what to be

There’s no hiding the fact that reality TV is mostly trash. And so are Queer Eye, The Real Housewives, Vanderpump Rules and RuPaul’s Drag Race . These shows are not ethical depictions of LGBTQ folks living in society or what that looks like. These shows serve as a means to entertain and bridge the LGBTQ – heteronormative gap.

Yet, when new Queer Eye seasons with a LGBB trifecta debut this May and late June, it remains especially difficult to not see the show as a display of sexual subservience – casting a lens towards male and female gay men as those who have power and authority over others.

I may not be a Queer Eye fan, but my queerness is representative of all four show’s many topics (Black women on TV! Mexican supermodels! Shark week!) and the struggles they’ve had to portray. Queer Eye and The Real Housewives, among many others, rarely portray female same-sex couples as partners who may or may not have children, and cannot escape viewers treating them as less than heteronormative, STI-free spouses. After all, a lesbian’s sexuality is not a fetish or a hidden desire; it is something that is considered normal, healthy and healthy for her body.

The question should not be whether a traditional show like Queer Eye has an obligation to portray same-sex relationships, but whether it has the right to. The correct response is rather one of forcing itself to do so. There are shows on television that depict women and men who do not experience same-sex attraction – and for good reason. None of these shows seem to intentionally portray same-sex couples or question their monogamous marriages or relationships. And yet, these shows never seem to grapple with the unnecessary, objectifying and demeaning way in which they portray lesbian households.

Last year, Ellen DeGeneres told Piers Morgan, “as a mother of a gay daughter, you can’t walk a block without a gay person in your life.” Yet, despite these realities, she is adamant that The Ellen DeGeneres Show does not feature gay couples, which is shockingly out of touch with our reality. Ditto other TV portrayals.

If queer and bi women are OK within the queer narrative, why is it inherently shameful for us to be supportive, devoted and worthy parents as much as male, heterosexual, non-bi parents might be?

Same-sex couples on TV could tell an image of what a home looks like that is actually positive and healthy for both mother and child. Anything short of that has been watered down so deeply that what we’re seeing is heartless and vengeful. And this is what our community currently endures.

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