India’s Modi scraps controversial and unpopular laws to mend damaged trust

The Indian prime minister, Narendra Modi, has scrapped controversial bills that threatened farmers and led to deadly protests in western India. The abolishment of the bills and the bills’ past, legal problems, signals that…

India’s Modi scraps controversial and unpopular laws to mend damaged trust

The Indian prime minister, Narendra Modi, has scrapped controversial bills that threatened farmers and led to deadly protests in western India.

The abolishment of the bills and the bills’ past, legal problems, signals that Mr. Modi is serious about listening to the people and working with people to improve the quality of life of Indian farmers.

The government said Friday that it will stop implementing two laws that were signed into law after violence in September. The protests resulted in the death of eight farmers.

Mr. Modi had signed the three laws along with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in 2015 to boost economic growth and curb illegal migration, drug trafficking and other crime.

According to the Times of India, India’s Information Technology Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad said that some of the clauses were of “legal quandary” and were presented to the government as without legal justification in June 2018. The government, however, had been delaying action on the laws despite their unpopularity.

The recently withdrawn acts included the Land Acquisition, Rehabilitation and Resettlement Act of 2013, the Beti Bachao Beti Padhao Law, and the Anti-Conversion Bill. The Land Acquisition Act for instance empowers the government to acquire land for public projects. Mr. Modi had dubbed it a land-grabbing law.

Mr. Modi’s government has repeatedly faced accusations of violating the human rights of Indian citizens through violent raids, land confiscations and privatization of public services.

The Supreme Court earlier in February overturned Mr. Modi’s 2015 decision to impose the “golden quadrilateral” on Muslim villages. The law would have allowed the government to win approval for development projects, including mines, dams and highways, by destroying the culture and environment of a Muslim village.

Leave a Comment