Finally, a chance to see Sharon & Bram live. And they’re playing the Hamilton.

When Sharon & Bram — the drum circle that formed in the ‘90s and morphed into one of Washington’s biggest summer attractions — opens its doors to new members, hundreds of young people will…

Finally, a chance to see Sharon & Bram live. And they’re playing the Hamilton.

When Sharon & Bram — the drum circle that formed in the ‘90s and morphed into one of Washington’s biggest summer attractions — opens its doors to new members, hundreds of young people will be among them. “They are in awe of this show,” says organizer Shannon Henry, who relocated from New York City to Washington in 2016. “They don’t know who Sharon & Bram are. And what an honor it is for them to have something so treasured be given to them.”

Henry and band member Sharon Mitchell became acquainted while studying at the School of Visual Arts in New York City and have gradually grown into a band for teens. They share what Henry calls their own “fresh, old-school vibe,” but a newly released live recording of a 2015 gig at Fort Monroe, Va., will be the perfect venue for even more unfamiliar faces to get to know the San Francisco-based foursome and its side project, North Pole Spirit.

After introducing Sharon & Bram to DC, the duo produced a farewell performance album in 2016, while also hosting a series of live jam sessions at local venues that continue to this day. The two will hit the road in support of that album this summer, playing more than half a dozen venues, including the Hamilton, Music Hall of Williamsburg, and, on July 12, the Hamilton Tavern.

The act performs behind the wheel of a 1990 Chevy Suburban (along with drummer Samuel Bader, who has joined the two regularly since 1997), and will do a dynamic show from a large van, based on the nonstop deluge of music all quartet members perform at home, combined with the stamina that comes from the successful show scheduled to hit theaters nationwide this summer.

“You are literally driving the festival to movie theaters everywhere,” says Henry. “The sheer number of people you will be playing to, and having to get on the road so quickly, will really test our endurance.”

Also, Henry warns that while the group looks forward to touring with theaters, Sharon & Bram — which promises an “old school, sound engineered, and produced” live album — doesn’t plan to stop its live performance dates at the Hamilton until it’s back in DC.

Also see, “Young Bethel,” the documentary that interviews women singing in the congregation of Sharon & Bram’s old stomping grounds in Pennsylvania.

Leave a Comment