Coffee farmer discovers chewy creatures trapped inside coffee that transforms her highlands village

Diane Graca was taking part in one of Bordeaux EcoCon’s weekends that feature the cheeseburger for growth in the fields. When Diane Graca was an agronomist in Bolivia, the National Training Institute Fama (INCRA)…

Coffee farmer discovers chewy creatures trapped inside coffee that transforms her highlands village

Diane Graca was taking part in one of Bordeaux EcoCon’s weekends that feature the cheeseburger for growth in the fields.

When Diane Graca was an agronomist in Bolivia, the National Training Institute Fama (INCRA) would send her to do pest surveys in Bocas del Toro – a district on the highlands highland region. It was there that she saw humans nesting on live copper trees, which is not common for those populations. It also brought to her attention that there was a flourishing industry in rodents. Rats are preferred among miners to steal high-priced precious metal, according to Graca, who notes that the rats have become so rampant they have destroyed 40% of the forest canopy.

Although this harsh reality has presented Graca with a dilemma on a large scale, it brought her near paradise once again. This year she was able to join a coffee plantation in a remote mountainous area in eastern Bolivia. It was a year that was completely unexpected. “We learned that there was life in the cactus because there was insect life” said Graca. “I saw insects on coffee beetles that I hadn’t seen before.”

In 2008, some farming ideas she found at INSTRA prompted Graca to come up with a plan to take back the land and turn it into coffee production. She has been working ever since. During this time, Graca has come to appreciate the importance of developing and thriving remote plantations, which cater to areas not accessible to modern methods of agriculture. More than 10% of coffee production in Bolivia is done by remote farming in that region, in spite of the threats the industry faces.

“This sun isn’t normal” said Graca.

Watch the video above to see what extraordinary conditions Graca faced on a remote cocoa farm in northeastern Bolivia.

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