Boston Globe US News & World Report by Glen Dickson 1980 by Glenn Dickson, June 28, 1980

Mr. B. Kurtz did not charge racial racism with the failure of the police and other government officials to prevent or attempt to prevent the assassination of Malcolm X, his younger brother Heman, the…

Boston Globe US News & World Report by Glen Dickson 1980 by Glenn Dickson, June 28, 1980

Mr. B. Kurtz did not charge racial racism with the failure of the police and other government officials to prevent or attempt to prevent the assassination of Malcolm X, his younger brother Heman, the law lecturer, said yesterday.

Mr. Kurtz, in a no-holds-barred speech in the top level lecture hall at the University of Connecticut, contended that members of the New York Police Department and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, including one of their chief officials, had known of facts about the assassination in advance but had not passed them on to him or other civil rights leaders.

Mr. Kurtz said, for example, that the anti-Malcolm and anti-black leaflets sent from New York by the Bader-Meir food company were gathered up and placed in Greenwich. He said he and Mr. Bennett had been told by another man in Greenwich that Senator Hayden had the information about the food company.

The case could be examined better now, Mr. Kurtz said, because a new murderer (or murderers) had been arrested. He said he had heard of other evidence from the same people, both before and after the shooting. But until that case was closed, Mr. Kurtz said, the evidence had not been examined. Mr. Bennett responded by telling the students that if the charges were true, they meant that there were two men charged with killing Malcolm X, Mr. Michel and a former member of Mr. Michel’s political party, A. Hall Griffin.

Leave a Comment