19-year-old Canadian convicted of laundering millions from Pakistan-based terror group for eight years

LISTEN HERE: A Canadian businessman-turned-convict orchestrated a sophisticated offshore scheme to launder money from the Pakistani Taliban before investigators closed in, sources close to the case tell FOX News. Rahul Khanna’s company invested more…

19-year-old Canadian convicted of laundering millions from Pakistan-based terror group for eight years

LISTEN HERE:

A Canadian businessman-turned-convict orchestrated a sophisticated offshore scheme to launder money from the Pakistani Taliban before investigators closed in, sources close to the case tell FOX News.

Rahul Khanna’s company invested more than $8 million in Pakistan-based airlines, helping to create the Blackberry Airplane in 2010. The venture was purchased by Canadian airline company All Nippon Airways (ANA). In a 2012 “Special Report” on FOX Business, Bob Bowman, president and CEO of American Airlines (FTR) and chairman of the All Nippon Airways Ltd. management committee, was quoted: “We have been served a subpoena by the United States Department of Justice. We are cooperating fully with this effort.”

Khyra “Mir” Aamir, who owned an immigration law office in Toronto, was one of Khanna’s advisers. According to sources, Aamir was a Malaysian citizen working for Khanna, and connected a large group of bank accounts around the world through transactions funneled through Aamir’s bank account. Khanna, who went to school in Canada, allegedly established a company in the British Virgin Islands to hide the money.

Three Aamir bank accounts, which were used to hide the money, were located at the City National Bank in Wilmington, Delaware. Over $5 million of the $8 million Khanna transferred to Aamir’s accounts was held in FRB Wilmington Savings Bank, which is also located in Wilmington.

According to Bloomberg, in 2015, agents from the North American Anti-Money Laundering Task Force, which includes the U.S. Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, raided Khanna’s office and seized records related to Aamir’s accounts. They were looking into money laundering charges, although that never came to fruition.

“Bank records from the Whale hedge fund, in which a Brazilian partner illegally over-inflated his partners’ financials, were often used to conceal related parties’ and clients’ illicit activities,” according to U.S. prosecutors and court documents. “Individuals at Khanna’s business used an offshore shell company to mask income and ownership shares in offshore entities.”

In 2014, a DEA informant helped investigators track a drug shipment that had been smuggled into the United States, say sources. This shipment was obtained from what they believed was a faceless third party that was run by Aamir. But that third party turned out to be Khanna.

Khyra “Mir” Aamir, who has a LinkedIn profile under the alias “Khalidayeen” and whom the DEA calls the first unindicted co-conspirator, is wanted by authorities in the United States and Canada for the alleged bank fraud scheme.

“It is believed that our suspect has not been seen by law enforcement in some time,” U.S. prosecutors said in court documents.

Khyra “Mir” Aamir has an address in Ukraine.

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